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Water Management District Reuse Programs

 


Northwest Florida Water Management District Reuse Progam
(Updated 2/1/11)

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The Northwest Florida Water Management District considers reuse planning an integral component of its water supply planning efforts. The District’s water supply assessments and regional water supply plans address the potential for reductions in water use through the use of reclaimed water.

The issuance of consumptive use permits is the foundation of the District’s regulatory reuse program. All consumptive use permit applicants who operate domestic wastewater treatment facilities must identify the volume of treated wastewater available, the level of treatment, the volume of reclaimed water available, all reuse customers, and the volume of reclaimed water provided to each.

Reuse Requirements Inside Water Resource Caution Areas

The Districtís reuse emphasis is placed on permittees located within the two Water Resource Caution Areas (WRCAs). Water use permittees located in a WRCA are required to use reclaimed water unless it is determined to be infeasible. Water use permittees in a WRCA, who generate reclaimed water, are required to evaluate the feasibility of using reclaimed water.

Chapter 40A-2, F.A.C., states that public water supply permittees that operate wastewater treatment facilities located within, serving a population within, or discharging to a WRCA are required to perform an analysis of the economic, environmental, and technical feasibility of providing reclaimed water for reuse within five years and of providing total reuse of reclaimed water within 20 years. Consumptive use permits issued to other non-potable water users within these areas are also routinely conditioned to require the permittee to investigate the availability of reclaimed water and to use reclaimed water if it is available and is technically, economically and environmentally feasible.

Reuse Requirements Outside Water Resource Caution Areas

While reuse efforts are concentrated within WRCAs, the District considers the use of reclaimed water outside of these areas an important component in its overall resource management strategy. A stated policy of the Water Resource Implementation Rule, Chapter 62-40, F.A.C., is to encourage use of water of the lowest acceptable quality. In many instances, reclaimed water fulfills this requirement. When determined appropriate, the District may also require permit applicants located outside of WRCAs to determine the feasibility of using reclaimed water. If determined feasible, the applicant is required to implement its use.

Other Efforts

In addition to implementing the regulatory aspects of the reuse program, the NWFWMD has recently implemented a reclaimed water initiative to examine available wastewater sources that could offset future non-potable demand. The reclaimed water plan will examine all wastewater utilities across the region, but particularly focus on the three regional water supply planning areas of the District. Projects identified from this plan will be incorporated into the regional water supply plan updates anticipated during 2010-2013. This plan is part of a continuing effort to coordinate between treated wastewater suppliers and possible end-users.

The Districtís reuse program is structured to provide incentives for non-potable water users to use reclaimed water. The Districtís water shortage plan, for example, does not restrict the use of reclaimed water during any water shortage phase nor does the District require that a water use permit be obtained for the use of reclaimed water. Additionally, the District will provide reclaimed water users with back-up water allocation in the event the reclaimed water source becomes unavailable.

Funding Assistance

The Districtís funding is provided from a combination of sources including ad valorem tax, general revenue appropriations from the Legislature, state programs and grants, and contractual services to local governments, regional utility authorities, and other governmental agencies. It is anticipated that the availability of funding assistance will be substantially dependent on future state appropriations. For more information on funding programs, please contact the District.

NWFWMD Reuse Contact:

Paul Thorpe
81 Water Management Drive
Havana, FL 32333-9700
phone:850.539.5999
Paul.Thorpe@nwfwmd.state.fl.us


St. Johns River Water Management District Reuse Program

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The St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) Governing Boardís policy is to implement reuse to the maximum extent feasible and provide greater availability of reclaimed water District-wide to conserve available water resources, in accordance with the State of Florida objective to encourage and promote water conservation and reuse. Therefore, all SJRWMD programs pertaining to reuse; including all pertinent regulatory requirements, planning, coordination efforts, and funding programs; are applied District-wide.

Reuse Requirements Inside Water Resource Caution Areas

Subsection 62-40.401(5), F.A.C., requires the water management districts to designate water resource caution areas as regions where reuse would be required if economically, environmentally, and technically feasible. Prior to the implementation of Subsection 62-40.401(5), F.A.C., SJRWMD policy and practice already required reuse throughout the District, where available and feasible. Therefore, the SJRWMD Governing Board designated the entire District as a Water Conservation Area to meet the requirements of Subsection 62-40.401(5), F.A.C. The Water Conservation Area designation was changed to Water Resources Caution Area in 1997, to conform with statewide nomenclature, but still covers the entire District.

Chapter 40C-2, FAC, requires reuse of reclaimed water, where feasible for all consumptive use permittees. In addition to requiring reuse where feasible, the SJRWMD CUP program also provides incentives for implementing reuse by including it as a favorable factor when determining permit durations and exempting reclaimed water from restricted outdoor irrigation hours. Where reuse is not currently feasible, most SJRWMD permits include a condition which requires the permittee to implement reuse when it becomes feasible.

The lowest acceptable quality water source, including reclaimed water, which is addressed in paragraph 40C-2.301(4)(f), FAC, must be utilized for each consumptive use. To use a higher quality water source, an applicant must demonstrate that the use of all lower quality water sources will not be economically, environmentally, or technically feasible. If the applicant demonstrates that the use of a lower quality water source would result in environmental impacts that outweigh water savings, a higher quality source may be utilized.

Reuse Requirements Outside Water Resource Caution Areas

SJRWMD has designated the whole District as a Water Resource Caution Area.

Other Efforts

SJRWMD currently is involved in a long-term water supply planning project, Water 2020, in which water sources to meet demands to 2020 are being identified. Planning for the implementation of reuse is an integral part of the Water 2020 planning process.

SJRWMD maintains a data base concerning domestic wastewater treatment and reuse on its Geographic Information System (GIS). These data are used to identify and assess reuse opportunities and to match potential reclaimed water users with suppliers. The wastewater treatment and reuse GIS data base supports SJRWMD’s planning and regulatory program and provide technical assistance to regulated water users and suppliers.

Funding Assistance

SJRWMD has two cost sharing programs to encourage the reuse of reclaimed water. Both of the programs began in FY 1996.

SJRWMD had $750,000 available for alternative water supply construction cost sharing during FY 1997. This cost sharing program is available to water suppliers and users, including local governments; water, wastewater and reuse utilities; industrial and agricultural water users; and other public and private water providers and users. Funds received through this program may be used only for the payment of capital and infrastructure costs of alternative water supply systems. Alternative water supply sources include water that has been reclaimed after one or more public supply, municipal, industrial, commercial, or agricultural uses; and supplies of stormwater, or brackish or salt water, that have been treated in accordance with applicable rules and standards sufficient to supply the intended use.

In addition to this program directly funded by SJRWMD, the District is pursuing federal funding for alternative water supply development projects.

SJRWMD Reuse Contacts:

Rich Burklew
Palm Bay Service Center
525 Community college Pkwy., SE
Palm Bay, FL 32909
phone: 800.295.3264
rburklew@sjrwmd.com


South Florida Water Management District Reuse Program
(Updated 6/29/11)

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The South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) is a regional governmental agency that oversees the water resources in the southern half of the state, covering 16 counties from Orlando to the Florida Keys and serving a population of 7.7 million residents. The SFWMD has developed an approach to encourage and promote reuse of reclaimed water involving planning, regulation, cooperative funding, and other coordination and cooperative efforts. The reuse program has been aggressive and successful in the utilization of reclaimed water.

The rules in Chapter 40E-2, F.A.C., provide the foundation for the Districtís regulatory reuse policies. All water use permit applicants within the SFWMD are required to address the use of reclaimed water as part of obtaining a permit for water use. For water users, this involves evaluating the use of reclaimed water as a water source. For public water suppliers, who directly or indirectly control a wastewater treatment facility, this involves implementing a feasible reuse program. The SFWMD issues water use permits with durations of up to 20 years. One factor considered in determining the duration of a permit is the development of alternative water sources, including the use of reclaimed water.

Reuse Requirements Inside Critical Water Supply Problem Areas

Critical Water Supply Problem Areas (aka Water Resource Caution Areas) include all or part of 12 of the SFWMDís 16 counties. Pursuant to Chapter 40E-23, F.A.C., reclaimed water is required to be used in these areas unless it is demonstrated by the water use permit applicant that reuse is not environmentally, economically, or technically feasible.

Additional clarification of District policy regarding reuse inside the Critical Water Supply Problem Areas is found in Section 3.2.3 (Reclaimed Water Use Criteria) of the Basis of Review.

Reuse Requirements Outside Critical Water Supply Problem Areas

In those areas of the District that are not designated a Critical Water Supply Problem Area, reclaimed water must be used in place of higher quality water sources when reclaimed water is readily available, unless it is demonstrated by the water use permit applicant that reuse is not feasible.

Other Efforts

The SFWMDís water supply planning initiative incorporates development of four regional water supply plans. These plans are updated every five years. The use of reclaimed water is an important water source option that is evaluated in these plans to meet anticipated future water demands over a 20-year planning horizon. These plans contain region-specific recommendations about the use of reclaimed water.
The District also facilitates reuse through coordination and cooperative efforts. These involve activities with utilities, local governments, water users, other agencies, and professional organizations.
Several areas within the SFWMD with limited water availability have implemented 100 percent reuse. The District supports water conservation and diversification of water supply resources in order to meet the needs of the region.
Population and demand for water is projected to continue increasing within the SFWMD. Reclaimed water is one option being evaluated to meet the increased need for water. Reuse has played an important role in South Florida's water supply and will continue to play a significant role in the future. Non-traditional reuse activities, such a wellfield recharge, salt-water intrusion barriers, and surface water augmentation are being evaluated to satisfy these future needs.

Funding Assistance

The Districtís planning and regulatory efforts are complimented by an Alternative Water Supply Funding Program which provides funding to local governments, public or private utilities, and other users for projects that develop alternative water supplies or promote water conservation.

SFWMD Reuse Contact:

Rick Nevulis
Mail Stop 2650
P.O. Box 24680
West Palm Beach, FL 33416
phone: 561.682.6242
rnevul@sfwmd.gov


Southwest Florida Water Management District Reuse Program
(Updated 1/31/11)

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Reuse Requirements Inside Water Resource Caution Areas

The Southwest Florida Water Management District  (SWFWMD) has declared four water resource caution areas. The rules in Chapter 40D-2, F.A.C., provide the foundation for the Districtís regulatory reuse policies. Domestic wastewater treatment facilities located in, serving a population within, or discharging to water resource caution areas must investigate the feasibility of water reuse. If it is determined feasible, then reclaimed water must be used. If reclaimed water becomes available, water use permittees must accept it (provided that the quantity and quality are acceptable for intended use, and use is technically, environmentally and economically feasible). Download the Economic Feasibility of Reclaimed Water Use by Non-Utility Water Use Permittees and Applicants.

Water use permittees who generate reclaimed water must submit an annual report to the District summarizing the quantity of wastewater generated, the quantity of reclaimed water reused, a list of reclaimed water customers, and a map depicting the reuse service area. Water users who receive reclaimed water must also submit an annual report that gives an account of their use of reclaimed water.

Annual Reclaimed Water Supplier Report Form Can be Downloaded from www.swfwmd.state.fl.us/conservation/reclaimed/

Reuse Requirements Outside Water Resource Caution Areas

In areas outside of water resource caution areas, Chapter 40D-2, F.A.C., requires applicants to use the lowest quality water available, including reclaimed water, for the proposed use if technically, environmentally, and economically feasible.

Other Efforts

The SWFWMD conducts numerous activities to promote and encourage reuse. The District Regional Water Supply Plan (completed every five years), and the District Strategic Plan (updated annually), provides a road map for managing and protecting water and related natural resources. The water supply policies pertaining to reuse in the plan include assuring the availability of an adequate water supply; regularly evaluating existing available water supplies and future needs; requiring that alternative sources be developed to the greatest extent practicable, considering feasibility of alternatives; and requiring that lowest quality water available to be used for suitable purposes.

Funding Assistance

SWFWMDís Cooperative Funding Initiative Program provides financial assistance to local governments and utilities for water resource related projects, including reclaimed water projects. Typically 50 percent of the cost of design and construction, pumping, storage, transmission, distribution, related appurtenances, and the development of reuse master plans is funded.

Through Fiscal Year (FY) 2011, the basin boards have budgeted approximately $327 million for 304reuse projects. When fully constructed the 304 budgeted Cooperative Funding Program reuse projects will increase reclaimed water use in the Southwest Florida Water Management District by approximately 223 mgd and result in 151 mgd of offsets to traditional water sources.

The District has developed a comprehensive reclaimed water web page to assist suppliers and users in maximizing available reclaimed water resources.

The Districtís Reclaimed Water Webpage is located at www.swfwmd.state.fl.us/conservation/reclaimed/

SWFWMD Reuse Contact:
Anthony Andrade
2379 Broad Street
Brooksville, FL 34609
phone: 800.423.1476
anthony.andrade@swfwmd.state.fl.us


Suwannee River Water Management District Reuse Program
(Updated 1/31/11)

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The Suwannee River Water Management District (SRWMD) is committed to developing alternative water supply programs with both public and private partners. Project development focus will balance the needs of our communities and natural systems. Alternative water supply funding is directed to partnerships that foster collaborative efforts in addressing resource issues.

Cost-share funding is made available to communities and other water users that have identified needs and have provided appropriate assurances the project will be implemented where fiscally practicable.

Reuse Requirements Inside Water Resource Caution Areas

Water Resource Recovery Areas. For projects located either wholly or in part within water resource recovery areas, the District shall presume that the use of alternative water supplies is feasible and must be implemented consistent with 3.2 of the Districtís Water Use Permitting Guide. Applicants shall coordinate with the District to identify alternative water supplies.

Water Resource Caution Areas: For projects located either wholly or in part within water resource caution areas, the applicant shall provide a feasibility assessment for alternative water supplies. The following criteria will be used to demonstrate feasibility:

  1. Environmental Feasibility: The use of an alternative water supply is considered environmentally feasible if the source is permitted or permittable under chapter 373 or chapter 403, FS.

  2. Technical Feasibility: The use of an alternative water supply is considered technically feasible if an uncommitted, adequate supply of alternative water supply is available at the site of the proposed use to meet all or part of the applicant's water needs. Determination of technical feasibility will be based on the following:

    • An uncommitted supply of alternative water supply means the average amount of alternative water produced during the three lowest-flow months minus the amount of alternative water that the provider is contractually obligated to provide to another user.
    • In the event the uncommitted supply of alternative water is not adequate to meet the project's demands, the applicant may request a partial allocation of water from a traditional source. However, such partial allocation will not exceed the amount necessary to compensate for the shortfall in uncommitted water supply, considering total project demands calculated pursuant to this Guide.
    • Available at the project site means that the supplier has initially provided the distribution facilities to the project boundary. In the event distribution lines are not provided at the project boundary, the applicant must provide an assessment of extending the lines as part of the economic feasibility analysis.
  3. Economic Feasibility: If the applicant asserts that the use of an alternative water supply is not economically feasible, the applicant must provide the District with an assessment of the economic feasibility. The applicant's economic feasibility analysis must include all of the following:

    • Capital and operation and maintenance costs.
    • Adjustment in the fees and rates charged by the applicant to account for the increased costs associated with using a alternative water supply; and
    • Design life of the alternative water supply system as compared with the time required to recover the capital cost.

Reuse Requirements Outside Water Resource Caution Areas

The applicant shall provide a feasibility assessment for alternative water supplies. The following criteria will be used to demonstrate feasibility:

  1. Environmental Feasibility: The use of an alternative water supply is considered environmentally feasible if the source is permitted or permittable under chapter 373 or chapter 403, FS.
  2. Technical Feasibility: The use of an alternative water supply is considered technically feasible if an uncommitted, adequate supply of alternative water is available at the site of the proposed use to meet all or part of the applicant's water needs. Determination of technical feasibility will be based on the following:
    • An uncommitted supply of alternative water means the average amount of alternative water produced during the three lowest-flow months minus the amount of alternative water that the provider is contractually obligated to provide to another user.
    • In the event the uncommitted supply of alternative water is not adequate to meet the project's demands, the applicant may request a partial allocation of water from a traditional source. However, such partial allocation will not exceed the amount necessary to compensate for the shortfall in uncommitted water supply, considering total project demands calculated pursuant to this Guide.
    • Available at the project site means that the supplier has initially provided the distribution facilities to the project boundary. In the event distribution lines are not provided at the project boundary, the applicant must provide an assessment of extending the lines as part of the economic feasibility analysis.
  3. Economic Feasibility: If the applicant asserts that the use of an alternative water supply is not economically feasible, the applicant must provide the District with an assessment of the economic feasibility. The applicant's economic feasibility analysis must include all of the following:
    • Capital and operation and maintenance costs.
    • Adjustment in the fees and rates charged by the applicant to account for the increased costs associated with using an alternative water supply; and
    • Design life of the alternative water supply system as compared with the time required to recover the capital

Other Efforts

Monticello Reclaimed Water Program Phase II:
The City of Monticello operates a 1.0 mgd wastewater treatment facility. The goal of this project is to develop a reclaimed water system to initially offset approximately 0.5 mgd of existing groundwater withdrawals at the Simpson Nursery. Project construction costs involve distribution and storage facilities.

Lake City Reclaimed Water Program Phase II:
The City of Lake City operates a 3 million gallon per day (mgd) wastewater treatment facility that uses a restricted public access spray field for disposal. The goal is to implement an agricultural reuse project to offset existing groundwater withdrawals, with expansion in the future. Project construction activities involve pumping facilities, transmission mains, distribution lines, and reclaimed water storage.

Suwannee River Partnership:
The partnership mission is to provide researched based solutions that protect and conserve water resources. Projects include agriculture irrigation management and Florida Yards and Neighborhoods.

Cedar Key Water & Sewer District Reuse Project:
This reuse project improved the efficiency of the Cedar Key Water and Sewer District existing reuse program. Project funding was for construction costs relating to storage and transmission distribution lines.

Cedar Key Plumbing Retrofit Pilot:
The City installed water saving plumbing fixtures for facilities in City Hall, the City Community Center, and their Elementary School. The water saving fixtures consisted of ultra low flow toilets, waterless urinals, and ultra low flow lavatory faucets. This water conservation pilot project was to assess the effectiveness of the fixtures. Based upon the results the District will be implementing a water conservation cost share program.

Funding Assistance

Initially, funding for the Districtís alternative water supply program was provided from the Water Protection and Sustainability Trust Fund (WPSTF). Although funding from the WPSTF during the past two years has not been available, the District has strived to undertake alternative water supply projects where financially and cost effective practicable.

Project selection emphasis is determined by potential demand offsets, project readiness, environmental benefits, and ability to cost-share. Conservation projects are being added to this report as a result of recent legislation authorizing funding conservation projects from the WPSTF. During Fiscal Year 2010, the District collaborated on three reclaimed water projects and two conservation project.

Project: Budget:
Monticello Agricultural Reclaimed Water Program, Phase II $705,200
Lake City Reclaimed Water Program, Phase II $419,435
Suwannee River Partnership $173,537
Cedar Key Sewer & Water District Reuse Project $25,000
Cedar Key Plumbing Retrofit Pilot $15,580

SRWMD Reuse Contact:

Steven Minnis
9225 CR 49
Live Oak, FL 32060
phone: 386.362.1001
sam@srwmd.org

or

Kevin Wright
9225 CR 49
Live Oak, FL 32060
phone: 386.362.1001
klw@srwmd.org

Last updated: December 12, 2012

  2600 Blair Stone Road M.S. 3500   Tallahassee, Florida 32399   850-245-8336 (phone) / 850-245-8356 (fax) 
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