Florida Department of Environmental Protection Kids Page Florida Department of Environmental Protection Kids Page Florida Department of Environmental Protection Kids Page

Environmental Postcards

The Florida Everglades

Map showing location of Everglades

The Everglades, spanning the southern tip of the Florida peninsula, is the largest remaining subtropical wilderness in the United States. It is actually a river, or wetland, featuring broad, shallow, slow moving water. Some call it a big swamp.

Nicknamed "the river of grass," the Everglades is home to an unusual plant called sawgrass. In some areas, the water is barely visible because the sawgrass is so thick.

Known for its rich animal and plant life, the Everglades is the only place in the world where alligators and crocodiles exist side by side. It is a refuge for large wading birds, such as the roseate spoonbill, wood stork, great blue heron and a variety of egrets. Featuring temperate and tropical plants, the river holds mangrove and cypress swamps, pinelands and hardwood hammocks.

On December 6, 1947, President Harry S. Truman dedicated the area as Everglades National Park to ensure protection of its unique plant and animal habitats. The park is home to many endangered species, including the Florida panther.

Today, the real Everglades is one half its original size. Both federal and state governments are committed to restoring and protecting this national treasure. There is only one Everglades.

< Return to map

The Florida Everglades postcard