Dr. Jerome Lorenz

Dr. Jerome Lorenz

Jerome (Jerry) Lorenz received a BS in biology from Northern Kentucky University in 1987 and a Masters Degree in Zoology from Miami University (Oxford, OH) in 1990. Since 1989 Jerry has been a staff scientist for the Audubon Society and has been primary investigator of the National Audubon Society's Florida Bay Estuarine Research Project since 1992. This project focuses on the impact of water management in the southern Everglades on the coastal ecosystems of Florida Bay. Specifically, the project examines the linkages between fresh water deliveries from the Everglades, the abundance of aquatic plants and prey fishes and the success of nesting Roseate Spoonbills. In August 2000, Jerry received a Ph.D. in Marine Biology and Fisheries from the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences. His dissertation was the culmination of 11 years of field research in Florida Bay and was awarded the Smith Prize for the most outstanding dissertation of the year by the Rosenstiel faculty. Upon completion of his Ph.D. Jerry became Research Director at Audubon of Florida's Tavernier Science Center. In 2004 he was named Alumnus of the Year by Northern Kentucky University for his work in the Everglades and Florida Bay. In 2005, Jerry was promoted to State Research Director for Audubon of Florida and currently manages an annual budget of approximately $1.5 million a year almost all of which he achieved through competitive bids to do research on CERP related projects. At the Tavernier Science Center, he directs a staff of 22 field scientists working on myriad ecological research projects associated with the Everglades, Florida Bay and the Florida Keys. In addition, he coordinates science staff at five Audubon facilities around the state. He has published peer-reviewed articles in many scientific journals and has made presentations at a variety of professional conferences.

He is very active in the Central Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP), a multi-billion joint venture between the state of Florida and the federal government to restore one of the nations most imperiled ecosystems. In this capacity he attends meetings of decision making bodies where he is frequently asked for expert testimony. He serves as a member of the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council (he also chairs the Ecosystem Restoration Working Group for this Council), the Village of Islamorada Land Acquisition Council, and is a founding member of the Florida Oceans and Coastal Resources Council—a fifteen member committee that was established by the Florida Legislature 2005 to direct and integrate scientific research in marine environments performed by various state agencies.