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Records show 2006-2007 were the driest back-to-back calendar years Florida has experienced, based on data dating back to 1932. Over thousands of years such events are both natural and regular. However, from a human perspective, they are an extreme event: something likely to occur only once every 200 years. Droughts affect the way we live, work and play. They also give us a fresh look at our environment.  During the 1998-2007 drought, federal, state and local governments, along with concerned citizens from every region of Florida, worked together to develop and implement strategies that effectively managed the environmental and economic consequences of the drought. These coordinated efforts ensured continued protection for public health and the environment. 

The Department of Environmental Protection addresses drought conditions using a combination of management strategies. These include regulation, enforcement, research and education, land acquisition and protection.

Florida has experienced droughts before, and will again in the future. Today, Florida is home to 17 million people and hosts over 40 million visitors every year. Over the next 20 years, Florida's population is projected to increase by nearly 50 percent and millions more tourists will make the state their vacation destination. Today, Florida is home to 17 million people and hosts over 40 million visitors every year. Over the next 20 years, Florida's population is projected to increase by nearly 50 percent and millions more tourists will make the state their vacation destination. As the state grows, so will the demand for water.

Lake Okeechobee - April 07
Floridians and visitors alike can make the difference in our ability to move beyond drought. There is no shortage of ways to can help.

Using water wisely reduces costs, protects the environment, and promotes public health at home, work, at play, or in your community.

 

Last updated: May 01, 2009

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