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Country Club Estates- Frequesntly Asked Questions Additional Information & Links

 

Country Club Estates Frequently Asked Questions

 

Below are questions asked and the answers provided by these agencies.


Site Investigation Section:

How do I get my soil tested?  How do I get my well tested and what is the cost of testing for a full range of contaminants?

  • Contact a local private laboratory. A private laboratory in Altamonte Springs charges $125 dollars for organochlorine pesticide analysis (including dieldrin) in water and $100 for the same analysis in soil. The sampling protocol for these analyses are fairly simple and basically require filling a water and soil container provided by the laboratory and placing on ice or storing in the refrigerator until the samples are returned to the lab. If you want to test for more constituents than just dieldrin, the cost for testing for a full range of potential contaminants could be quite expensive and well over a $1000. In addition some of the sampling protocol would be complex and probably best conducted by an environmental consultant. Below is a list of laboratories than are approved by the Florida DOH to analyze for dieldrin. Please make sure that the laboratory has a method detection limit (MDL) less than the HAL for dieldrin of 0.002 ug/L (micrograms per liter) for the water analysis.

 

E82574 

Advanced Environmental Laboratories Inc. 

Drinking Water  

EPA 508 

Dieldrin 

Jacksonville 

FL 

(904) 363-9350  

E87836 

American Water Works Service Co. Inc 

Drinking Water  

EPA 525.2 

Dieldrin 

Belleville 

IL 

(618) 239-0544  

E87893 

Anatek Labs Inc. 

Drinking Water  

EPA 505 

Dieldrin 

Moscow 

ID 

(208) 883-2839  

E51259 

City of Tallahassee Water Quality Laboratory 

Drinking Water  

EPA 525.2 

Dieldrin 

Tallahassee 

FL 

(850) 891-1200  

E87412 

Columbia Analytical Services Inc. - WA 

Drinking Water  

EPA 508.1 

Dieldrin 

Kelso 

WA 

(360) 577-7222  

E871040 

Edge Analytical Inc. 

Drinking Water  

EPA 508.1 

Dieldrin 

Burlington 

WA 

(360) 757-1400  

E871040 

Edge Analytical Inc. 

Drinking Water  

EPA 525.2 

Dieldrin 

Burlington 

WA 

(360) 757-1400  

E87668 

Energy Laboratories Inc. - MT 

Drinking Water  

EPA 525.2 

Dieldrin 

Billings 

MT 

(406) 252-6325  

E87610 

Environmental Conservation Laboratories Inc. - Cary 

Drinking Water  

EPA 505 

Dieldrin 

Cary 

NC 

(919) 677-1669  

E87487 

Environmental Science Corporation - TN 

Drinking Water  

EPA 508 

Dieldrin 

Mt. Juliet 

TN 

(615) 758-5858  

E87997 

Eurofins Lancaster Laboratories Inc. 

Drinking Water  

EPA 508 

Dieldrin 

Lancaster 

PA 

(717) 656-2300  

E87997 

Eurofins Lancaster Laboratories Inc. 

Drinking Water  

EPA 525.2 

Dieldrin 

Lancaster 

PA 

(717) 656-2300  

E12700 

Florida DOH Bureau of Laboratories - Jacksonville 

Drinking Water  

EPA 505 

Dieldrin 

Jacksonville 

FL 

(904) 791-1508  

E12700 

Florida DOH Bureau of Laboratories - Jacksonville 

Drinking Water  

EPA 525.2 

Dieldrin 

Jacksonville 

FL 

(904) 791-1508  

E86006 

Florida-Spectrum Environmental Services Inc. 

Drinking Water  

EPA 508 

Dieldrin 

Ft. Lauderdale 

FL 

(954) 978-6400  

E83018 

Flowers Chemical Laboratories 

Drinking Water  

EPA 505 

Dieldrin 

Altamonte Springs 

FL 

(407) 339-5984  

E96080 

HBEL Inc. Palm City 

Drinking Water  

EPA 505 

Dieldrin 

Palm City 

FL 

(772) 465-8584  

E37645 

Illinois Environmental Protection Agency Laboratory 

Drinking Water  

EPA 525.2 

Dieldrin 

Springfield 

IL 

(217) 524-6387  

E871024 

MWH Laboratories a division of MWH Americas Inc. 

Drinking Water  

EPA 505 

Dieldrin 

Monrovia 

CA 

(626) 386-1125  

E871024 

MWH Laboratories a division of MWH Americas Inc. 

Drinking Water  

EPA 525.2 

Dieldrin 

Monrovia 

CA 

(626) 386-1125  

E87752 

NSF International - MI 

Drinking Water  

EPA 525.2 

Dieldrin 

Ann Arbor 

MI 

(734) 769-8010  

E37910 

NYS DOH Organic Analytical Chemistry Laboratory 

Drinking Water  

EPA 508 

Dieldrin 

Albany 

NY 

(518) 473-0030  

E87753 

National Testing Laboratories Ltd. 

Drinking Water  

EPA 505 

Dieldrin 

Ypsilanti 

MI 

(734) 483-8333  

E87753 

National Testing Laboratories Ltd. 

Drinking Water  

EPA 525.2 

Dieldrin 

Ypsilanti 

MI 

(734) 483-8333  

E871094 

Northern Lake Service Inc. 

Drinking Water  

EPA 525.2 

Dieldrin 

Crandon 

WI 

(715) 478-2777  

E53398 

Orange County Utilities Central Laboratory 

Drinking Water  

EPA 508.1 

Dieldrin 

Orlando 

FL 

(407) 254-9550  

E53398 

Orange County Utilities Central Laboratory 

Drinking Water  

EPA 525.2 

Dieldrin 

Orlando 

FL 

(407) 254-9550  

E83079 

Pace Analytical Services-Florida 

Drinking Water  

EPA 508.1 

Dieldrin 

Ormond Beach 

FL 

(386) 672-5668  

E83079 

Pace Analytical Services-Florida 

Drinking Water  

EPA 525.2 

Dieldrin 

Ormond Beach 

FL 

(386) 672-5668  

E84129 

Southern Analytical Laboratories Inc. 

Drinking Water  

EPA 508.1 

Dieldrin 

Oldsmar 

FL 

(813) 855-1844  

E84129 

Southern Analytical Laboratories Inc. 

Drinking Water  

EPA 525.2 

Dieldrin 

Oldsmar 

FL 

(813) 855-1844  

E87688 

Summit Environmental Technologies Inc. 

Drinking Water  

EPA 508 

Dieldrin 

Cuyahoga Falls 

OH 

(330) 253-8211  

E84809 

SunLabs Inc. - Central Laboratory 

Drinking Water  

EPA 525.2 

Dieldrin 

Tampa 

FL 

(813) 881-9401  

E87052 

TestAmerica - Savannah 

Drinking Water  

EPA 508 

Dieldrin 

Savannah 

GA 

(912) 354-7858  

E87052 

TestAmerica - Savannah 

Drinking Water  

EPA 525.2 

Dieldrin 

Savannah 

GA 

(912) 354-7858  

E87775 

UL LLC 

Drinking Water  

EPA 525.2 

Dieldrin 

South Bend 

IN 

(574) 233-4777

 

How large of an area is affected by the dieldrin pollution?  Is Orange City in the danger zone and if so, what areas?

  • Orange City is not impacted by any dieldrin applications or releases that occurred near the Country Club Estates neighborhood.  Dieldrin does not migrate great distances once dissolved in ground water.

 

What is the cost of testing privately?  (Soil and Water)

  • A private laboratory in Altamonte Springs charges $125 dollars for organochlorine pesticide analysis (including dieldrin) in water and $100 for the same analysis in soil.

 

Who did the ads from the 50’s that were used in the presentation?

  • Both ads provide Shell Chemical Corporation contact information at the bottom of the page

 

Why does everyone around me have dieldrin in their wells but I don’t?

  • Our study showed that many residences with dieldrin above the Health Advisory level (HAL) were drawing shallow ground water contaminated with dieldrin into the well.  Your well may be installed to a deeper depth or be in better condition (without corroded or leaking casing) than your neighbors' wells.  Additionally you may be located far enough from a source of dieldrin that there is no dieldrin present in the immediate area of your well.

 

My water sample had a “Y” qualifier (sample not properly preserved).  Does this affect dieldrin analysis?  My first sample did not have this qualifier.

  • The only preservative required for dieldrin in a water sample is cooling the sample to 4 degrees Celsius (39.2 degrees Fahrenheit). Laboratory protocol requires that if the laboratory determines that the sample upon receipt was at a temperature greater than 4 degrees Celsius the Y is included as a qualifier. As dieldrin is not particularly temperature sensitive we would not recommend re-sampling if the laboratory results are similar between the two analyses.

 

My well was sampled by the same company twice, 11 months apart.  Why were the numbers the same?

  • The dieldrin ground water plume is relatively stable at this point. We would not expect large fluctuations in concentrations to occur at any one sampling point.

 

Your presentation shows contaminated wells outside the Country Club Estates area and no clean wells beyond the furthest contaminated wells. What is contaminating the other areas and why were samples not collected outside the outlying contaminated wells?

  • We attribute the presence of contaminated potable wells in neighborhoods located east and north of Country Club Estates due to the nearby presence of dieldrin treated soils, most likely foundation and lawn applications of dieldrin.  The Volusia County DOH determined the extent of the potable well sampling.

 

Volusia County (and St. Johns River Water Management District) has had a well contractor completion report program since 1974.  Were any of the Volusia County well completion reports incorporated into the study?

  • Yes – we reviewed available SJRWMD records available from their website. These records ranged from 1985 until present.

 

Your presentation indicates eastern migration of dieldrin. Why are the current negative test results considered final?

  • These results are not considered final. DEP/VCDH have indicated plans to resample potable wells in three to five years.

 

You stated that dieldrin will last 29 years as a termiticide in home foundations yet it has a half life of 5 years. How do these two figures correlate?

  • The half life indicates a 50% reduction in concentration every 5 years. We have estimated the initial concentration at application for a termiticide would be greater than 100,000 ug/Kg. Based on the half life, this concentration would be reduced over time yet still be at a sufficient concentration in the soils to be an effective insecticide.

 

How can a resident with high concentrations of dieldrin in their soil make their property safe (i.e. how can I remediate dieldrin contaminated soil?)

  • If residents remain concerned about the possibility of dieldrin in the soils in their yards (even at concentrations below what DOH considers safe), they can hire an environmental consultant to perform soil sampling to delineate the extent of contamination, if any, and propose a plan to excavate and backfill or perhaps just add clean soil and sod to cover the contaminated area.


Volusia County Health Department

Several of the 'blue' houses were retested and results came back 'red.' Are there plans to continue retesting to see how many more will change?

  • Volusia County Health Department, with support from the state office of the Department of Health (DOH) and Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) have indicated plans to resample potable wells in three to five years in this area based on the DOH Well Surveillance Protocol. If a private well owner has their well tested on their own and dieldrin is detected, then the program will confirm the results.

What are the current methods of treatment on both recreational and agricultural properties?

  • For a list of current termiticides registered in Florida for preventive treatment of new construction, please see the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Affairs Bureau of Entomology and Pest Control's website: http://www.floridatermitehelp.org/index.html.

Why were homes built and dieldrin used if there was a warning about its use in the 1900s?

  • From our (DEP) understanding, the precautionary statements shown during the SIS presentation came from a termite control manual in the 1960s. Based on observations of dieldrin effects during the decades of its use, the EPA banned all uses (except as a termiticide) in 1974 and then banned all uses in 1987. The Department does not have information about building codes in the mid-1900s.

Why is there a difference bewteen the federal and state HAL for dieldrin?

  • The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provides a range for a HAL (Health Advisory Level) based on risk. Florida, in its effort to protect its citizens, has chosen the most conservative (lowest) level within that range.

What precautions should we take when gardening or mowing our lawns?

  • If a resident suspects that dieldrin was used as a termiticide and/or a pesticide on the property, avoid activities that bring the chemical in the soil to the surface, i.e. digging. Normal activities in a grass-covered yard should pose very little risk.
    • DOH has developed safe gardening tips at: http://www.myfloridaeh.com/medicine/superfund/safegardeningtips.pdf.
    • Add clean soil or compost to your garden and consider raised beds of clean soil, especially to grown root crops.
    • The exposure to chemicals in the soil by incidental ingestion is greater for children because of their typical hand-to-mouth behavior. Always practice good hygiene and wash your child's hands after playing in the yard and especially before eating. We suggest taking shoes off at the door of the house to keep from tracking dirt/dust into the house.

Why do we need to connect to public water if the 'poison' won't harm us?

  • While the health risk resulting from exposure to groundwater in Country Club Estates is very small, it is still recommended to use public water to avoid any unecessary risk to your health.

What studies back up the statistic quote in the Daytona Beach News Journal, "with the trace levels of dieldrin found at Country Club Estates, you would need to drink 2 liters of water/day for 60 years to expect any damage?"

Will wells on the south side of Orange Camp Road be tested? If not, can we request to have our well tested?

  • DOH recommends that every homeowner with a well test their water. Bacteria are the most common contaminant in well water. If a homeowner has concerns about other chemicals, the homeowner should test for those chemicals. If dieldrin is found above the HAL, then DOH will perform additional tests and coordinate with DEP to see if the homeowner is eligible to be connected to a public water system or have a filter installed.

We were told that as long as there were houses that came back over the HAL, testing would continue. It seems that testing has stopped. What are the plans to test (all directions) beyond the perimeter of the existing test area?

  • Dieldrin testing by the state outside of Country Club Estates will be evidence based. The state will consider past land use, especially if agricultural prior to 1974, the age of the house (if built before 1987), and the age of the private well, or other data, such as a private well owner having a private lab result indicating the presence of dieldrin.

City of DeLand:

Steps to Connecting to City Water- Information provided by the City of DeLand  [.pdf 320 KB]

 

Does the City water come from the same aquifer (source) as my private well? Should I be concerned about the City water being contaminated? How is City water tested? How are the City wells constructed and "not proven to leak?"

  • City wells are drilled into the Floridan aquifer and cement grouted into the formation. The casings are grouted under pressure from the limestone up to land surface. This results in a well more resistant to contaminants deposited at land surface and also to corrosion.  City well casings are inspected via closed circuit TV if casing failure is suspected.  Residential wells may be more prone to contamination because they are frequently not constructed by this method.  Their casings may not be sealed or are sealed with bentonite clay instead of continuous cement grout.  City water is tested for some parameters each week in our own certified laboratory and for other contaminants quarterly, annually or on a three year cycle for others.

What are the lab results from the City wells that Country Club Estates (CCE) is connected to (well #4 and well #7) and can these be/are these published anywhere and if so, how often? Can we have quarterly access?

  • CCE is connected to a network of 19 wells located throughout the greater DeLand area. The closest well to CCE is located on Torchwood Drive at what we refer to as Water Plant No. 7. This well has been sampled several times during the last two years for Dieldrin and results have been ND (Not Detected) or in one case 0.0004 micrograms per liter which was below the minimum detection level of 0.0005 micrograms per liter documented by the DEP test lab. The City publishes an annual Consumer Confidence Report which is a summary of all analyses conducted and distributes it to all customers. Customers can contact the City anytime regarding analytical results and they will gladly furnish results and explain their significance.

 

Have carbon filters been installed on the city well supplying CCE and if so when was it done and how are they maintained?

  • The City does not use carbon filters.

 

If we did not received a letter to hook up, where do we go to sign up? Will there be a control valve for me to switch between City and well water so I can use my well water for irrigation?

  • Contact the City of DeLand at 386-626-7009 for information on connection. If you connect your residence to City water, no valve or interconnecting piping from your well to City water piping on or off your property is allowed and you will be required to install a reduced pressure backflow preventer upstream of the City water meter to preclude cross connection of the City water supply with your well water. You may connect your well directly to your irrigation system.

 

The treatment of foundations for termites is required under the city building code. Why did the City allow the use of dieldrin if they knew it was harmful?

  • The City of DeLand was not involved in building permits or regulations in Country Club Estates because it is outside the City limits, however when dieldrin was used to treat homes during this time frame the possible health and environmental effects of the pesticide were not established.

Why is the City going through the trouble and expense of connecting homes if there is no potential of harm?

  • The City was asked by numerous residents and DEP to provide an alternative water source. The goal of the Water Supply Restoration Program is to provide this alternative source of drinking water in the event of an exceedance of a HAL (Health Advisory Level).

 

When will the connection be scheduled from Princeton Road?

  • Within the next 90 days with time depending on whether the customer or DEP is having the piping from house to meter installed.

 

Will the valuation of properties declared "hot" that were reduced by ~50% be returned to a full valuation after connection to City water?

  • For questions on property values, contact the Volusia County Property Appraiser at 386-736-5901.

 

What criteria were used to decide between ¾” or 1” supply lines to homes?

  • One inch lines will be installed at all homes; 3/4 inch meters are typically installed.

Water Supply Restoration Program:

Where does the grant money come from? Taxes?

  • Funding is from the Water Quality Assurance Trust Fund, which is funded through taxes on chemical manufacturers and users.

 

If we test positive at a later date will we have to pay to connect?

  • WSRP should be able to pay for future connections at sites with potable wells found to be contaminated with dieldrin (as confirmed by Health Department sampling) as long as the program continues to be funded and the law is not changed.

 

If we hook up now can we be reimbursed later?

  • No, only sites served by private potable water wells are qualified.  Once a property is served by public water it will no longer be qualified for assistance.

Have residents of homes identified as high concentration of dieldrin been notified? 

  • Yes – once a violation has been discovered by the County Health Department, WSRP delivers notification of the contamination and information on WSRP’s program to the property owner. The County Health Department also delivers laboratory results.

It has been over one year since my filter was installed. When will it be replaced? Will we continue to receive filters until we are connected to City water?

  • Pre-filter cartridges will be provided if needed. The filter contractor is inspecting filters to verify the filter system is operating correctly and will address any problems. They will also report meter readings, looking for any site with excessive water usage (>15,000 gallons per month). Connections to public water are expected to be completed by the end of August, so no filter will be older than 1¼ years old. Testing at filters with similar contamination (same adsorption capacity) and at sites with high water usage has shown these filters last over three years. Therefore at one year of usage there is still a lot of adsorption capacity left. No filter exchanges are needed.

 What is the status of DEP provided filter systems after a home is connected to city water?

  • No new filters will be installed, because connections will be available soon. As soon as the public water is available, no additional filter maintenance will be provided. Property owners are free to accept public water but if they decline the connection they can elect to keep and maintain the filter at their own expense or we will remove the filter.

What labs are qualified to test for dieldrin?

  • This information should be on the Volusia County Health Department’s web page. Also note that when selecting a lab, inquire if its detection level is equal to or less than 0.002 ug/L, which is the standard.

 

 Will contaminated wells be capped off? If so what are the costs to homeowners?

  • There is no requirement for the abandonment of these wells.  Most well owners choose to keep their wells active.  Costs for abandonment vary depending on details of the well.

Will well systems used for irrigation be ‘made whole’ if filters are removed and if the filters are not removed what maintenance will be required?

  • If an owner decides to keep their well and use it for irrigation and the filter is removed, or they fail to keep up with filter maintenance, and dieldrin is present, there is a chance of ongoing exposure from the use of that water.  If an owner elects to keep the filter it will be their filter and they should determine maintenance schedules. Maintenance will vary depending on water usage, frequency of usage and water quality. 

Why were residents never notified in 1983 about the state recommendation to hook up to city water after EDB was discovered and why was the recommendation never acted upon?

  • The original connections at sites with EDB violations in the area were done in 1989.  Additional EDB sampling in the area continued past that time and no EDB violations have been found after 1989.  Officials involved in the original EDB work are no longer with the State so no statement can be made about what their recommendations may have been.  In general, it is always recommended that if a public water supply is available that a property connect to that system or that the property owner test their own well water (as public water systems do on a regular basis) to confirm their water is safe to use.


Water Management District:

Will contaminated wells be capped off? If so what are the costs to homeowners?

  • If a “contaminated well” in this study area is in good condition, the homeowner may continue to use the well for landscape irrigation, if they wish.  If the well is not in good condition, it would be the homeowner’s responsibility to engage a Florida licensed water well contractor to repair or plug the well.

 

Where can I get information on well construction?

  • Contact Bill Adams at the SJRWMD at badams@sjrwmd.com or a Florida licensed water well contractor. Local well contractors are good sources of general information on well construction, and they can provide specific information on well construction practices in a given area.


Site Investigation Section City of Deland Water Supply Restoration Water Management District

New graphicSite Investigation Section (SIS):

The Site Investigation Section Report with appendices and Appendix A part 1are large files.  These may load slowly.

 


 

Last updated: October 04, 2012

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